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Ode To Pluto

Ode To Pluto, a parody poem based on What's in a name?
View from from the surface of one of the moons of Pluto. Pluto is at center, Charon is to the right, an additional moon to the far left. By NASA, ESA and G. Bacon (STScI) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Updated December 19, 2016
By Corrine Lane     Leave a comment on Ode To Pluto

Ode To Pluto

It is but your name that is demeaned.
You are yourself, though not a dwarf planet.

What’s “dwarf planet?” It is not consciousness, nor ego,
Nor shadow, nor desire, nor any other vital
Belonging to the force. O, be some other name!

What’s in a name? That which we call a demon
By any other word would guard the underworld.

So Pluto would, were he not dwarf planet called,
Retain that obsessive penetration which he owes
Without that title. Pluto, shed your name,
And for that name, which is no part of you
Transcend like a phoenix.

 


 

The above “Ode To Pluto” is a poem I wrote as a sort of parody of Juliet’s speech from Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet, Act 2, Scene 2, lines 38 — 49, in which she says the famous line: “What’s in a name? That which we call a rose, by any other word would smell as sweet.” Here is the entire section which I made a parody of for my poem, “Ode To Pluto.”

Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet, Act 2, Scene 2, lines 38 — 49. Juliet speaking:

‘Tis but thy name that is my enemy.
Thou art thyself, though not a Montague.
What’s Montague? It is nor hand, nor foot,
Nor arm, nor face, nor any other part
Belonging to a man. O, be some other name!
What’s in a name? That which we call a rose
By any other word would smell as sweet.
So Romeo would, were he not Romeo called,
Retain that dear perfection which he owes
Without that title. Romeo, doff thy name,
And for that name, which is no part of thee
Take all myself.

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